Workshop

10:35 - 11:15

Wednesday 12 May

Public sector resource allocation algorithms

While there is lots of ongoing work unpicking the algorithms that make decisions about individuals, there seems to be less about the algorithms that make decisions about resources we rely on such as funding for schools, or the number of beds in hospitals. The processes, algorithms, models, spreadsheets, and data that inform these resources can be inaccessible and opaque, containing errors and embedded policy assumptions. This workshop will start with an overview of a recent event on this topic organised by the Royal Statistical Society’s Data Ethics and Governance section. Participants will then debate how this topic affects the social sector, work that is already happening, and what additional activities could or should take place.

11:55 - 13:25

Wednesday 12 May

How to use - Tableau

Data is an increasingly important tool used to make evidence-based decisions, however, often one of the hardest things is turning a boring spreadsheet into something that will engage decision-makers and bring to life the story of the data. If you ever find yourself repeating the same sums in Excel or producing the same graphs over and over again for reports, then this workshop is for you! Using Tableau, we will explore ways to automate these processes, saving you a lot of time and resources in the long run. This workshop will cover an introduction to data visualisation & dashboards, how to connect to data sources, introduction to data manipulation techniques, build a simple interactive dashboard tracking key organisational metrics, how you can have easy updates of the reports if data updates or changes, how you can download the visuals for static reports (for example, in pdf form for a meeting) and good practices for dashboard design…and you don’t need to be able to code to do any of the above! Experience with spreadsheet data (e.g. using Excel) is beneficial for this workshop.

15:20 - 16:15

Wednesday 12 May

Collecting better data about a place so that it feels more relevant to people that live there

Data collection about place is led by administrative organisations. But that often means it's collected for a named geography that people don't necessarily identify with. The data collected may not truly represent that area, and so create data-informed decisions that don’t feel relevant to people. This session will start a (structured) conversation to see if people have experiences or ideas for how data about places can be made more relevant to local people. For example, you might begin thinking about co-producing non-administrative, geographical boundaries that are meaningful for the people that live there, and considering what data sets could be best used for that place.

15:25 - 16:55

Wednesday 12 May

How to use - Excel

Are you looking to increase your confidence in using Excel, and get quick insights from your data to answer organisational questions? This workshop will cover data layout, sorting, filtering and basic data manipulation. We’ll also look at basic formulas, making charts, and tips for designing your spreadsheets to make them easy to follow.

12:15 - 12:40

Tuesday 11 May

How to use geospatial data

This session aims to inspire attendees to make use of their own, and externally held, geospatial data and equip them with the knowledge to do so. Based on a broad range of real life examples of nonprofit use of geospatial data that range in complexity, the type or format of data, tools used, and eventual visual output, attendees can follow along with each stage and leave the session inspired to map their own data.

13:20 - 14:50

Tuesday 11 May

How to do impact reporting for small organisations

Developing an impact report for the first time can feel like a daunting and time-consuming project, especially for a smaller organisation with limited comms capacity. With a bit of guidance and a useful template, this session will give small charities a jump-start by creating a bite-sized one or two-page impact report that can be easily updated and adapted to fit a website, social media, or funder report. They may even find this is all they need to get their message out to the public and key stakeholders!

15:20 - 16:15

Tuesday 11 May

How to use GrantNav

Learn how to use GrantNav, 360Giving’s free search-engine for grants data, to answer your questions about grant giving in the UK. GrantNav, their flagship online tool, lets you explore, download and analyse data for £billions worth of UK grants - and it’s recently been improved and updated. In this session, 360Giving will explore and analyse UK grants data on GrantNav. You’ll leave the session understanding how GrantNav can help answer your questions and how to get the most from the new version. The session is for existing and completely new users to GrantNav, whether you’re a funder, researcher, charity fundraiser, or anyone wanting to explore UK grants data.

10:35 - 11:30

Monday 10 May

I am me: equalities data for everyone

Do you collect equalities data about your members, service users, beneficiaries, staff, or volunteers? It may be required by funders, through contracts, as part of recruitment processes, or to identify need or gaps in service provision. But how do we ensure that this isn't just a tick box exercise? How can we capture the identities of the real people we interact with? This session will challenge participants to think about why and how we collect equalities data. Through thought-provoking interactive exercises and game play, participants will consider the importance of self-identification and how to allow space for intersectional data to emerge. Delivered by facilitators working on equalities issues that truly aim at including everyone, this workshop helps 'I am me' to be captured as a reality, and avoids the sterility of tick boxes.

10:35 - 11:30

Monday 10 May

Setting up a place-based data group: lessons learned and how you can try your own

How do I set up a local data for good use group? This session begins with three short presentations from local data for good groups across the UK (West Midlands Open Data Forum, Sheffield Data for Good, and current plans for the North East) to show how they went about setting up, the challenges they faced, and what has gone well. There will then be a structured, practical workshop for attendees to plan how they might set up something in their own area, who they might want to approach, and what they're going to do next to make it happen.
13:35 - 14:35 & 14:45 - 15:45 & 15:55 - 16:55

Monday 10 May

Running a Virtual Data Expedition (3 Sessions)

What does a data process look like, and where do I begin? Join this Data Expedition, an intensive, action-learning workshop that teaches a way of working with data from ‘start to finish’: from identifying a question you have, to finding and using data to try to answer it, to telling a story with it. It will build confidence working with data, and help participants use data to better inform what they do.

14:40 - 15:20

Monday 10 May

How to use the Arts & Culture Benchmark to inform your work

This workshop is for arts and culture organisations who want to compare and contrast their current business model to those of their peers in order to find new opportunities for income development and cost management. We will also look at how we could redefine financial 'success' in the future to more thoroughly encompass ideas of financial resilience, balance, and health.

15:35 - 16:30

Monday 10 May

How to CRM

This is a practical session for people interested in a lightweight CRM. The Good Ship will share the CRM template they built in Airtable, and provide examples of other organisations who have used it, and how they’ve done so. Participants can then make a copy and start using the CRM for themselves. They can then work out a quick action plan of how they could adapt it for their organisations and how they would get others on board.

15:35 - 16:30

Monday 10 May

Community mapping in Tanzania: a local solution towards SDG monitoring

Crowd2Map is a volunteer project that for five years has been mapping rural Tanzania into OpenStreetMap in order to support community development and better protect girls from FGM (female genital mutilation). Our Digital Champion network is now mapping access to water and health facilities at a village level. This workshop will outline the lessons learnt so far, share how they developed their methodology, and conclude with a practical mapping session.